Dan Telvock

Dan Telvock is Investigate Post's environmental reporter. A native of the Finger Lakes region, he was an award-winning newspaper reporter in Virginia for 13 years, including stints at The Free Lance-Star in Fredericksburg and The Winchester Star, before joining Investigative Post. He founded and operated The Landry Hat, a blog that covered the Dallas Cowboys, from 2005 to 2008, while also working as a reporter.

Apr 5

2018

Neighbors contest bid to expand Niagara landfill

A hazardous waste facility in the Town of Porter with a history of spills and regulatory violations is seeking state permission to construct a new landfill, which one nearby resident has decried as “insanity.” CWM Chemical Services is one of only a handful of hazardous waste facilities in the Rust Belt. Before CWM ran out of space in 2015, it accepted toxic materials such as PCBs, lead and asbestos, from industrial plants, brownfields and Superfund sites across the United States and Canada. The company has tried for over a decade to obtain a permit to construct another landfill on their[...]

Posted 6 years ago

Feb 28

2018

Landfill expansion faces community opposition

 CWM Chemical Services, the only commercial hazardous waste landfill in the northeast, wants to expand its operations in the Niagara County Town of Porter.  The new landfill would be large enough to fill 1,200 Olympic sized pools with toxic materials contaminated with PCBs, lead and asbestos and other hazardous waste. If a state panel approves the application, as many as 220 trucks a day would rumble past homes and the Lewiston-Porter Schools for up to three more decades. The application process is moving forward despite public dissent and CWM’s history of spills and environmental violations, an Investigative Post analysis of state and[...]

Posted 6 years ago

Feb 7

2018

Schools, county at odds over lead testing

 Buffalo’s lead poisoning crisis – some 1,000 children are diagnosed every year with dangerous levels of lead in their blood – could be worse than reported, Investigative Post has determined. School officials can verify that only about half the children enrolled in pre-kindergarten and kindergarten have been tested at least once for lead poisoning. It’s uncertain how many got tested twice by the age of 3, as required by state law. In light of this, the schools have proposed to provide free lead screenings for incoming students and younger siblings at community schools and two mobile health clinics. But[...]

Posted 6 years ago

Feb 2

2018

Scajaquada among state’s unhealthiest creeks

 The state Department of Environmental Conservation’s National Heritage Program released new data that shows Scajaquada Creek is part of a series of connecting streams and rivers that ranks 11th unhealthiest in the state. The designation might help bring additional funding for clean up. Both Cheektowaga and the Buffalo Sewer Authority will spend in total more than $140 million to upgrade sewer systems that pollute the creek. The sewer systems in these two localities spew a half-billion gallons of sewage into Scajaquada Creek each year. For Cheektowaga, it will take about a decade to complete the sewer repairs and a few[...]

Posted 6 years ago

Jan 30

2018

Telvock discusses Wheatfield landfill on WBFO

Investigative Post’s environmental reporter Dan Telvock joins Press Pass this week to discuss the latest developments in the state’s investigation of  a toxic landfill in Wheatfield.    

Posted 6 years ago

Jan 22

2018

State: Toxins in Wheatfield landfill contained

 State environmental regulators concluded Monday that tests show a landfill in Wheatfield that once held Love Canal waste is not contaminating neighboring properties. The findings run counter to claims made by plaintiffs in a class-action lawsuit against the Town of Wheatfield, which owns the landfill, and seven companies believed to have dumped there. The state Department of Environmental Conservation declared the landfill a Superfund site three years ago after the removal of  80 dump-truck loads of Love Canal waste buried there in 1968. The DEC had said the landfill remained contaminated from other dumping that occurred from 1955 to[...]

Posted 6 years ago

Dec 14

2017

More progress for Scajaquada Creek

Two Western New York communities will get almost $6 million from the state for projects that will reduce the amount of untreated sewage spewing into Scajaquada Creek. The Western New York Regional Economic Development Council awarded the Town of Cheektowaga $5 million. The town will use the funding to repair damaged sewer pipes that get inundated with stormwater, which causes untreated sewage to be discharged into the creek. In addition, the Village of Depew received a total of $780,000 for two sewer-related projects. One of the projects will reduce untreated sewage from entering Scajaquada Creek by repairing damaged sewer lines and storage[...]

Posted 7 years ago

Dec 7

2017

Many localities not reporting sewer overflows

Many local governments across the state fail to report sewer overflows discharged into water bodies, an environmental group reported Thursday. In addition, about one-third of the reported sewer overflows since 2013 did not include the volume, which the group said could be in violation of state law. An Investigative Post analysis shows the Village of Kenmore is this year’s worst offender in Western New York of failing to report the volume of sewage and stormwater overflows. The state passed the Sewage Pollution Right to Know law in 2013. It requires cities, towns and villages to publicly report information about all[...]

Posted 7 years ago
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